How To Make Money Online Fast and Easy
22May/18Off

Growth Office Hours with Anu Hariharan and Gustaf Alstromer

22May/18Off

Growth Office Hours with Anu Hariharan and Gustaf Alstromer

21May/18Off

Growth is NOT just Growth

Growth involves much more than just grow retention, conversion or increase any specific action. I know that you have been listening and seeing Growth like ever before. Strategies that increased the conversion in X%, retention grew Y% and a lot of other numbers that grow based on smart movements. But at the end of the day, we need to discuss and prepare a lot of stuff before start and analyze behavior, numbers to optimize growth

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21May/18Off

From Messenger Bots to the Growth of ‘Gram, Social Media Examiner’s Annual Report Reveals Trends to Watch

2018 Social Media Marketing Trends from Social Media Examiner Report

2018 Social Media Marketing Trends from Social Media Examiner ReportEngagement is down. Trust is dwindling. And the most popular social media marketing platform is now riddled with uncertainty. For marketers, the social space has never felt more daunting or perplexing. Luckily, Social Media Examiner recently released its 2018 Social Media Marketing Industry Report, the latest annual snapshot of where things currently stand in this critical frontier. While the report doesn’t answer all our questions, it does offer some helpful clarity and context. We’ve gone through Social Media Examiner’s in-depth report, which gathered input from more than 5,700 respondents, and distilled some of the most noteworthy nuggets for marketers to noodle on and insights on how you can improve your efforts. Here’s what you need to know about the state of social media marketing in 2018. #1 - Facebook is in flux. Although it continues to be easily the most prioritized social network for marketers at large, Facebook has become a source of quandary. This pie chart, displaying responses to the question, “My Facebook organic post reach has declined in the last year,” illustrates this quite well: That’s a remarkably even split, but the bottom line is this: more than half of marketers either agree or strongly agree that their organic reach has dropped since 2017. This comes as no surprise, since Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has all but admitted that the platform is shifting feed prioritization away from branded content in favor of user-generated posts.    Despite this, Facebook remains the most-utilized social channel for marketing with 94% penetration, nearly 30 percentage points above the next-highest, and 67% of respondents point to it as their most important platform. Facebook’s gargantuan active user base is impossible to ignore. We just need to get creative in finding ways to connect with people there, as only 49% of respondents feel their marketing is effective on the platform. [bctt tweet="Facebook’s gargantuan active user base is impossible to ignore. We just need to get creative in finding ways to connect with people there. - @NickNelsonMN #SocialMediaMarketing" username="toprank"] What Should I Do? Obviously, paid will play a major role; 67% of marketers plan on increasing their use of Facebook ads in the coming year. But, as TopRank Marketing’s Caitlin Burgess has written, influencer marketing also offers a path to capturing attention in the age of diminishing organic reach. And that’s an opportunity that fewer marketers are hip to, with 61% reporting that they are not working with influencers as part of their social media efforts. #2 - The ‘Gram is in. While Facebook continues to rule the roost, its prized subsidiary is most noticeably on the rise. Instagram is now the second most commonly used social media platform for marketers, jumping up from the No. 4 slot in 2017 with a 54% gain. via GIPHY Our own Josh Nite recently coined the term “hopping on the ‘gramwagon,” which I love, and there’s definitely a widespread movement in that direction. Two out of three marketers said they plan to boost their organic activities on Instagram in the next year, while 53% intend to increase their investment in ads on the platform. This makes sense given that 80% of marketers cited visual images — core to Instagram’s interface — as their most commonly used type of social media content and 32% said it was the single most important type, beating out blogging (27%), videos (24%) and live video (9%). Seeking to take advantage of its growing momentum, Instagram is in the process of rolling out several new features for businesses. As you might guess, Instagram is a more popular focus for the B2C cohort (72%) than B2B (57%), where LinkedIn remains the most prevalent non-Facebook option. What Should I Do? Is it time for your business to jump on the ‘gramwagon? Not necessarily. Instagram has a sizable audience and some great features, but isn’t the right fit for every business type. Determining whether it’s a good fit will ultimately depend on who your ideal customer and audience is, as well as your business objectives and available team and budgetary resources. These insights and examples around Instagram marketing might help inform your decision. #3 - Video is the vision. The marketing community at large is taking a keen interest in the world of video. Fifty-eight percent of marketers said they plan to increase their YouTube organic activities in the next 12 months. And while only 24% of marketers currently peg video as the most important social media content type, 77% expressed an intention to grow their reliance on it going forward, topping the list. When asked which forms of content they wanted to learn more about, respondents chose video (77%) and live video (68%) above all others. What Should I Do? The beauty of video is that it doesn’t follow a linear format. You can and should experiment to find the right format for your message and audience's tastes, as well as to match what you’re trying to accomplish at different stages of the funnel. If you’re among those eager to learn more about video, our team recently shared some tips for first-time video marketers. And if you’re already exploring this tactic, our Annie Leuman shared examples of brands connecting with audiences through long-form video. #4 - What about bots? Facebook Messenger first launched an API for bots back in 2016, but there still aren’t too many marketers wading into this pool. Only 15% of respondents said they’re currently using Facebook Messenger bots as part of their marketing mix. However, 51% said they plan to include this tactic in future marketing. One does wonder, however, if such plans will be altered by Facebook’s maneuvers to restore faith amid privacy concerns. The company quietly paused the ability of developers to add new chatbots in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. What Should I Do? This remains a relatively nascent tool for engagement, but it’s worth getting familiar. Why? Because it has the potential to be an “always-on” marketing team member. But like any new feature or technology, you need to be thoughtful and engaged as you develop and launch your plan, as well as monitor To provide some recognizable context, this blog post does a nice job laying out the similarities and differences between email and messenger bots. #5 - Measurement moving forward. Here at TopRank Marketing, we’re big on concrete reporting and analytics, so we’re glad to see 44% of marketers now stating that they’re able to measure ROI from social media activities, up from 38% last year. That’s still less than half, and only 10% strongly agreed, so there remains considerable room for improvement. Incidentally, Seb Joseph wrote earlier this month at Digiday that advertisers questioning ROI might be Facebook’s biggest threat. What Should I Do? Most of the major social platforms have deep measurement functionality that you might not be utilizing. Make sure to explore back-end dashboards and pinpoint metrics that align with your objectives. Additionally, Sprout Social compiled a list of the best social media analytics tools of 2018. [bctt tweet="Most of the major social platforms have deep measurement functionality that you might not be utilizing. Explore back-end dashboards & pinpoint metrics that align with your objectives. - @NickNelsonMN #SocialMediaMarketing" username="toprank"] Solving Social Media Marketing in 2018 The constantly changing dynamics of social media marketing make it an especially challenging landscape to navigate, but the sheer number of users and level of activity make it one that none of us operating in the digital world can afford to ignore. While the latest Social Media Marketing Industry report points to several areas of of uncertainty and shortcoming, it also shows that marketers are moving in the right direction when it comes to grasping ROI, embracing video, and diversifying their strategies. Hopefully the tips we’ve provided here can help you with these initiatives. While its standing is still impressively strong, I’ll be curious to see if Facebook loses its dominant footing in the year ahead, and how other players might pivot to take advantage. Want to read the full report? Head on over to Social Media Examiner. Looking for additional social media insights, trends, and tips? Peruse our lineup of recent social media marketing blog posts.

The post From Messenger Bots to the Growth of ‘Gram, Social Media Examiner’s Annual Report Reveals Trends to Watch appeared first on Online Marketing Blog - TopRank®.

21May/18Off

From 32 to 1,000+ Employees: My Growth Journey with Skyscanner

It was the earliest days of the travel startup, a small company with the right ambition and a good problem to solve — make searching for cheap flights easier for travelers. This startup would end up being acquired for £1.4 billions 6 years later, having gone through 10X growth several times, expanding to 10 offices all over the world and growing to over 1,000 employees. My journey started as a Market Development Manager for the Italian market, responsible for: -validating product and channel market fit -localizing a commercial offering and marketing strategy -customizing a local product that spoke “Italian”

18May/18Off

Why your growth depends on taking risks with your hiring strategy

There’s a key turning point for your hiring strategy in a rapidly scaling team or organization. The inflection point is when you go from only being comfortable hiring star candidates who pose very little risk to taking chances on candidates who don’t tick all the boxes but who have promise and potential. Making that transition smoothly is crucial for your longer-term growth.

The earliest hires are critical to a team’s future identity, as this is the time when the culture takes shape. One risky, mediocre or downright bad hire can disrupt the culture at this formative stage. It’s imperative that early hires are able to hit the ground running and are excited by a chaotic startup environment.

People who enjoy or require structure and process make great hires for a larger organisation, but they’re usually not the best people to take on board from the start. There are also candidates who check a lot of the boxes – they’re excited about the company, hungry for growth and eager for a challenge, but they don’t have a proven track record of rolling with the punches and thriving in ambiguous environments. They would need a lot of coaching, mentoring and time; something your tiny early stage team doesn’t have in abundance.

Hiring strategy for early stage startups

Those early hires not only need to thrive under pressure, they need to love it. They need to have both the ability to work as part of a scrappy team, but also be independent in figuring things out for themselves. Guidance is limited, innovation and creativity are key to success.

My own experience is instructive – I joined Intercom as the 6th Customer Support teammate in the Dublin office when we were about 20 as a global team. We’ve since scaled to more than 35 in Dublin the past 2 years – and 110 globally in the first half of 2018. We will continue to grow at lightning speed over the next few years.

We didn’t have the bandwidth to coach anyone who couldn’t hit the ground running

When the team was tiny and in true start-up mode, we only took on people who we believed right away would be able to succeed with very little support. We didn’t have the bandwidth to coach anyone who couldn’t hit the ground running and we turned down some good applicants who definitely had potential as it wouldn’t have been fair to them to throw them in at the deep end without the support they would have needed. We simply didn’t have the systems in place to set them up for success.

At a certain scale, the bandwidth for coaching and mentoring increases to the point where it is possible to hire people who display good potential but need that extra bit of assistance. However, learning how to identify when a small team is mature enough to take this big step is critical. Unfortunately, we didn’t get the timing right on this first time around.

Scaling up your hiring strategy

Just after I joined the team, we started to scale very quickly. We promoted a lot of tenured teammates at once as they were ready for their next challenge, but in doing so we left ourselves with a frontline team full of brand new people.

We have a backbone of senior teammates who mentor and coach

A lesson learned from this was to stagger promotion dates until you have a larger pool of tenured folk. Ambitious people who join early-stage startups are chomping at the bit for progression and work their asses off to get it, but some tough management decisions need to be made on timelines until those on the frontline are onboarded, settled and ready to coach the new round of new hires.

As we’ve scaled, we’ve expanded in size and into more specialised roles. We now have an enablement team that has created really solid onboarding. We have a backbone of senior teammates who mentor and coach. We’ve rolled out an official 3-month mentoring program for new hires and we’ve built out an amazing onboarding plan; all things we didn’t have time or resources for initially.

We’re in a position now where we can hire people who have potential and match our values, but who need a nurturing environment. We’ve had lengthy discussions as a hiring team if this means lowering our bar, or diluting our culture. However, there’s a significant difference between lowering your bar and giving those with potential a chance.

Determining your changing criteria

Before you take this leap, you need to establish a list of “must haves” for people who join your team, versus qualities that are “nice to have” but coachable.

Invariably there will be differences from team to team in terms of the qualities that are essential and those that are ultimately coachable. On our Customer Support team, those criteria look like this:

Must haves:

  • Customer focus (prioritize customers above other tasks)
  • Empathy and ability to listen/de-escalate a situation
  • Patience and ability to clearly explain complex issues to someone who doesn’t understand
  • Ability to make clear decisions around prioritization, and at the very least recognize when they prioritized poorly and how to do better next time
  • Genuinely enjoys being part of a team
  • Puts the team’s wellbeing above their own personal gain
  • Recognizes when quality of work could be better
  • Recognizes when they were in the wrong/could have done better
  • Appreciates fair, constructive feedback
  • Recognizes when processes could be better and has ideas on what could change.
  • Expresses a desire to have more ownership.
  • Loves learning new things and strives to upskill.
  • Genuinely wants to work in a challenging environment.
  • Pushes themselves to learn and get better.
  • Expresses a desire to have an impact in their role.

Nice to haves:

  • Comfortable giving constructive feedback to peers
  • Comfortable giving constructive feedback to leadership
  • Examples of making changes to bigger processes in work/school.
  • Clear career progression in previous roles.
  • Had a big impact on their last company.
  • Has a clear view of their career path.
  • Even though ambitious, clearly understands that mastery of a role takes time.
When hiring for potential becomes a must

Hiring for potential is not about lowering the bar – it’s about widening the criteria in certain attributes and values where the team can offer coaching and support. Giving potential a chance is smart when your team is mature enough to handle it.

It is an absolute necessity if you want your team to continue growing

It’s also about planning for the long term rather than the near term. Hiring a bunch of superstars all at once means they’ll get bored quickly and outgrow their positions faster than you can find promotion opportunities. Of course, it’s great to have some of these people on the team, but you also need to hire people who are starting out in their careers and will form the backbone of your team as they grow with you.

The key thing to appreciate about this evolution is that it isn’t merely an added bonus of having a larger, more mature team with more bandwidth for coaching and mentoring. Instead, it is an absolute necessity if you want your team to continue growing and retaining talent. Learning how to identify the right moment and manage that transition will be one of the keys to your long-term, sustainable growth.

Does this sounds like the sort of environment that you would enjoy? We are actively hiring – check out our openings.

Careers at Intercom

The post Why your growth depends on taking risks with your hiring strategy appeared first on Inside Intercom.

16May/18Off

Andrew Chen on finding the "fresh powder" in growth

Andreessen Horowitz general partner Andrew Chen has helped the likes of Uber, Dropbox and AngelList tackle growth. In this new interview with Intercom, he shares where he sees fresh opportunities for today’s startups.

16May/18Off

What is the difference between the NSM and growth equation?

Should my team focus on the NSM or the variables that come from Growth Equation? What is the objective of Growth Equation is the growth team is focused on the NSM? Do I use the Growth Equation to derivate the NSM?

16May/18Off

Growth Hacking is Not Magic, it’s a step-by-step Process

In this article (19 min read on Medium with more than 2,4K claps), I’ll dig into the Growth Hacking Methodology I’ve been trained at during the 3-month in-house program of the Growth Tribe Academy in Amsterdam. Note that I will make a particular focus on the Rapid Experimentation process that a lot of successful tech startups have used to scale their business. Hope that knowledge can help some of you! I developed particularly 3 steps : - STEP 1: Before applying the GH Methodology blindly, make sure that you reach the Product Market Fit - STEP 2: The five prerequisites to implement the growth hacking process in your organization - STEP 3: STEP 3: Implement the Rapid Experimentation Process

16May/18Off

Growth Hacking is Not Magic, it’s a step-by-step Process

In this article (19 min read on Medium with more than 2,4K claps), I’ll dig into the Growth Hacking Methodology I’ve been trained at during the 3-month in-house program of the Growth Tribe Academy in Amsterdam. Note that I will make a particular focus on the Rapid Experimentation process that a lot of successful tech startups have used to scale their business. Hope that knowledge can help some of you! I developed particularly 3 steps : - STEP 1: Before applying the GH Methodology blindly, make sure that you reach the Product Market Fit - STEP 2: The five prerequisites to implement the growth hacking process in your organization - STEP 3: STEP 3: Implement the Rapid Experimentation Process